Description
Five letters from representatives of the Bombay Government to Lewis Pelly discussing affairs in Baroda:Letter from C Currey, Bombay to Sir Lewis Pelly, 7 January 1875, apologising that he was unable to visit Baroda as he was recalled to Bombay a day early. The letter goes on to ask whether the Durbar at Baroda would authorise a survey of the line from Anund [Ānand] by Viltud? to the Saburmattee [Sābarmatī] and regarding some papers which may not have been sent to him from the Government at Bombay (ff 3-4).Letter from C Currey, Bombay to Sir Lewis Pelly, 9 January 1875, regarding a telegram about N Fernandes and instructions to relieve him immediately. (ff 5-6).Letter from Patrick Ryan, 117 Nepean Sea Road, Bombay to Sir Lewis Pelly, 15 January 1875, regarding the progress of Pelly's policy at Baroda and the success of Pelly's impartiality and firmness in handling matters there. The letter also discusses Pelly's remonstrations at Frank Henry Souter's report; the police seizing Khemchund's money and valuables, which are now in the Government Treasury; and monies already carried away from Khemchund's shop (ff 7-8).Letter, marked private, from Patrick Ryan, Bombay to Sir Lewis Pelly, 22 January 1875, regarding Pelly's applications for Native Agents; the Government of Bombay being in the dark over the future of Baroda state; Calcutta's intentions to restructure the Native Administration of Baroda regardless of the outcome of the trial; and the suggestion of Mr Nana Moorjee for the judiciary and Sir Michael Westropp's thoughts on him. Also discussed in the letter are Donabhoy Narojee, Second Magistrate, having expressed a desire to serve at Baroda and Sir Bartle Frere's high regard for him; and the English press's thoughts on Pelly's policy (in reference to the Spectatorhaving applauded Lord Northbrook's choice of Pelly as Special Commissioner at Baroda) (ff 9-10).Letter from Charles Gonne, Bombay to Sir Lewis Pelly, 21 January 1875, regarding Pelly's offer of a place to stay at Baroda and regarding Pelly's management of affairs there (ff 11-12).
Description
The volumes comprise trade and commerce reports, primarily for Bahrain but also for Arabistan and Bushire covering the period 1918-1924.The reports included in the volumes are:Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the year ending 31 March 1918(ff 7-39)Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the year ending 31 March 1919(ff 51-78)Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the year ending 31 March 1920(ff 108-136)Trade Report of the Province of Arabistan for the year ending March 1920(ff 145-170)Trade Report of the Port of Bushire for the year 1919-1920(ff 172-190)Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the years ending 31 March 1921 and 31st March 1922(ff 211-224)Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the year ending 31 March 1923(ff 228-256)Report on the Trade of the Bahrain Islands for the year ending 31 March 1924(ff 310-338).The volumes also include amended versions of the reports where discrepancies were noted in them; and printed copies produced by the Government of India.The correspondence in the volume primarily comprises letters from the Political Agent at Bahrain sending out copies of the reports to interested parties, and acknowledgements of receipt in reply; some correspondence with the Eastern Bank Limited, Director of Customs at Bahrain, and Yusuf Ahmed bin Kanoo relates to requests from traders, exporters and other interested parties for trade statistics and information relating to trade and commerce in Bahrain.The first folio of volume one comprises correspondence between the Political Agency at Bahrain and the Political Residency in Bushire from 1948-1950 regarding a circular issued by the Foreign Office in 1948 which outlined a new format for trade reports.
Description
The file comprises correspondence between the Political Agent at Bahrain (Clive Kirkpatrick Daly), the Mesopotamia Persia Corporation Limited (W Meikle), and Yusuf bin Ahmed Kanoo regarding the value of pearls exported from Bahrain April 1923-March 1924 for inclusion in the 1923-1924 Bahrain Trade Report.
Description
The file comprises copies of letters, telegrams and other papers relating to the attempted visit to Bahrain and Kuwait by Winifred Howard-Clitty, a writer of children’s books, in the winter of 1933/34. The principal correspondents in the file are: the Political Resident in the Persian Gulf, Lieutenant-Colonel Trenchard Craven William Fowle; the Political Agent at Bahrain, Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Gordon Loch; the Political Agent at Kuwait, Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Richard Patrick Dickson.The file includes:correspondence relating to Howard-Clitty’s application to the authorities to visit the Persian Gulf; her particular interests in collecting material for her books (including Bedouin and pearl diving stories); her intentions to travel to Kuwait in order to meet a man named Muhammad Yatim and write a book with him; her intentions to travel to Bahrain to meet with Yūsuf bin Aḥmad Kanoo;correspondence relating the circumstances leading up to the 1933 trip, specifically Howard-Clitty’s previous trip to Bahrain in 1931, where she first became acquainted with Yatim and Kanoo, and copies of correspondence exchanged between Howard-Clitty and Kanoo during the intervening period (ff 5-12);concern amongst British officials at Howard-Clitty’s intentions: relating to Yatim’s poor reputation, the prospects of a European woman visiting and intending to stay at the homes of Yatim in Kuwait and Kanoo in Bahrain (which Kanoo himself is equally uncomfortable about); reported concern of the Sheikhs of Kuwait and Bahrain at the presence of a unaccompanied European woman in their territories;continued updates from British officials in Basra during the period December 1934 to February 1934, where Howard-Clitty resided while awaiting the opportunity to meet her contacts, up until 26 February 1934, when the Bahrain Political Agent reports that Howard-Clitty has left Basra, ‘hysterical and possibly consumptive’, and angry at British officials efforts to obstruction her travel arrangements (ff 45-46). A complete account of Howard-Clitty’s stay in the region is also provided by the Bahrain Political Agent (ff 54-57);reports of Howard-Clitty’s manuscripts having been stolen while en route to Baghdad, her attempts to rewrite her manuscripts from memory, and British officials’ fears that Howard-Clitty may write a book or series of articles that are critical of the British authorities in the Gulf (ff 59-60);recommendations from India Office and Foreign Office staff in London that, in future, all women wishing to travel to the Persian Gulf be made to apply to the Political Resident (f 50).
Description
The volume comprises four parts discussing affairs in Muscat which are indirectly related to the Muscat Arbitration discussed in parts 1 and 2:part 3 discusses a possible revision of the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation between Great Britain and Muscat, originally signed in 1892;part 4 considers the status of Muscat citizens living overseas and whether they were entitled to British diplomatic assistance;part 5 discusses a dispensary opened in Mutra [Maṭraḥ] by the American Mission hospital, against the wishes of the Sultan of Muscat (Fayṣal bin Turkī Āl Bū Sa‘īd);part 6 relates to the proposal to construct a new hospital in Muscat and initial financial donations towards the scheme.The volume comprises parts 3, 4, 5, and 6. Each part includes a divider which gives the subject and part numbers, year the subject file was opened, subject heading, and list of correspondence references contained in that part by year. This is placed at the back of the correspondence.
Description
The volume comprises telegrams, despatches, correspondence, memoranda, printed reports and notes, relating to the Consulate Affairs in Jeddah, following the outbreak of war with the Ottoman Empire and the withdrawal of the British consul at Jeddah.Further discussion surrounds correspondence with Italy and the Netherlands over arrangments for the maintenance of buildings and the payment of staff, and the refusal of the Turkish Government to allow the American Consular Agent in Aden to visit Jeddah.The principal correspondents in the volume include the Viceroy, Lord Hardinge; the Political Resident, Aden, the Paymaster General's Office; the Under-Secretary of State for India and the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.Each part includes a divider which gives the subject and part numbers, the year the subject file was opened, the subject heading, and a list of correspondence references contained in that part by year. This is placed in the back of the correspondence.
Description
The volume comprises telegrams, despatches, correspondence, memoranda, and notes, from 1914 to 1918 relating to the delimitation of the Turco-Persian border. It contains two parts IOR/L/PS/10/522/1 and IOR/L/PS/10/522/2.The discussion relates to leave and leave allowances to civil officers and subordinates who served with the Commission, and medals awarded by the Persian Government in recognition of services with the Commission.IOR/L/PS/10/522/2 contains reports on the Turco-Persian Frontier.The principal correspondents in the volume include the Secretary of State for India, Sir John Broderick; the Under-Secretary of State, India Office; and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Office.
Creator
Bahrain Political Agencyet al, Political Agent, Bahrainet al
Description
The file consists of miscellaneous official and demi-official correspondence relating to the outbreak of World War One and its impact on Bahrain (which is generally referred to in the papers as Bahrein). Most of the correspondence dates from 1914.The papers largely consist of correspondence from the Political Agent, Bahrain and the Political Resident in the Persian Gulf, but also includes correspondence in Arabic and English between Sheikh Isa bin Ali Al Khalifa [Sheikh ‘Īsá bin ‘Alī Āl Khalīfah], Ruler of Bahrain and the Political Agent. The papers include regular reports by the Political Agent on general conditions in Bahrain. Specific topics include: proposed increase in Agency guard, June 1914; proposed regulations covering foodstuffs, pearls and security [1914]; Turkey, and the possibility of Turkish support for Bin Saud [‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd (Ibn Sa‘ūd)], July 1914; the pearl trade, August 1914; prohibition of export of foodstuffs, August 1914; food prices, August, October 1914; effect on customs receipts, September 1914; problems caused by unemployed Kurds and Basris in Bahrain, September - October 1914; distress among pearl divers, September 1914; currency issues, October 1914; rumours of German ships in the Persian Gulf, October 1914; the services rendered by Sheikh Abdullah [Sheikh ‘Abdullāh bin ‘Īsá Āl Khalīfah] to the British, the statement that he had been the moving spirit behind the donation of 9600 rupees by Sheikh Isa's family to British charitable war funds, and the recommendation that he receive an honour, November 1914; and hardship caused by the infrequent arrival of mails, March 1917.
Description
Text in Arabic and English of the 1938 Treaty between Great Britain and the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman which was concerned with promoting and extending their commercial relations by the conclusion of a new treaty to replace the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation signed at Muscat on 19th March 1891 which was terminating on 11th February, 1939. The treaty was signed in Muscat on 5 February 1939 by Sir Trenchard Craven Fowle, Political Resident in the Persian Gulf and Saiyid Sa'id bin Taimur [Sa‘īd bin Taymūr], Sultan of Muscat.The 23 articles concern freedom of commerce and navigation; ownership of land; customs duties; imports; charging of tonnage against ships; appointment of consuls; assistance in case of shipwreck; jurisdiction; freedom of conscience and religious toleration; length the Treaty shall remain in force (12 years).
Description
The file comprises notifications, resolutions, circulars, and memorandum from the following Government of India departments: the Finance Department, Home Department, Foreign and Political Department, Department of Industries and Labour, Army Department, Department of Education Health and Lands, Department of Overseas Trade, and Department of Commerce.Included in the file are:the announcement of an updated version of the Indian Arms Rules, 1878, published in 1924 and subsequent amendments to the wording of revised rules throughout 1924 and 1925;amendments to the Superior Civil Services (Revision of Pay and Pensions) Rules 1924;amendments to the warrant of precedence in India, including additions to and removals from the warrant, and changes to the position of titles within the order of precedence;alterations and amendments to the rules on passage allowances, pensions, leave rules, payments to subscribers of the General Provident fund, and the premature retirement rules;the publication of 'rules for the supply of articles for the public service' in 1924 and the subsequent publication of a list of authorised firms as required under the rules;a copy of the dress regulations for officers of the political department under the Government of India and the Government of Bombay and amendments to those regulations;amendments to regulations for the study of foreign languages;corrections to the 'Manual of Instructions to Officers of the Political Department of the Government of India';instructions relating to the purchase of publications in the United Kingdom for official use by Government of India departments;an Order in Council enacted by His Majesty King George V to enable an amendment of the Government of India Act allowing the Secretary to the High Commissioner to India to make and discharge contracts on behalf of the Secretary of State for India in the High Commissioner's absence;correspondence between the Political Resident in the Persian Gulf, Francis Beville Prideaux and the Political Agent at Bahrain, Clive Kirkpatrick Daly, following the announcement that the Daly was to be made a Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire (C.I.E.);the announcement of the death of Queen Alexandra (wife of Edward VII) and information relating the official memorial service for her, and procedures for official mourning.
Description
The file comprises copies of telegrams written in cypher, some of which have the decoded words written above in pencil. The cyphers in use in the file are the Government Telegraph Code and the Indian Word Code, and correspondence from the Government of India is also included regarding the updated Indian Word Code released in 1926.Further correspondence between the Civil Commissioner at Baghdad and the Political Agent at Bahrain relates to the assignment of a word under the Indian Word Code to represent Ibn Saud [‘Abd al-‘Azīz bin ‘Abd al-Raḥmān bin Fayṣal Āl Sa‘ūd] in correspondence between them.Also included in the file is correspondence between the Political Agent at Bahrain and the Officer Commanding the 2/1st Brahmans at Muscat regarding new rates of pay for the men under his command.
Description
The file comprises correspondence between the Political Agent at Bahrain and the Director of Education in Baghdad regarding the need for a primary school head teacher in Bahrain and enquiring as to the process of recruiting someone suitable.The file also includes an Iraq Department of Education Syllabus for primary school teaching in Arabic and English, and copies of the forms used by primary schools in Iraq to record pupils' attendance.
Description
This file concerns protests by Petroleum Development (Qatar) Limited to the British Political Agent at Bahrain regarding the plan of Shaikh ‘Abdullāh bin Jāsim Āl Thānī, the Ruler of Qatar, to impose a system of taxation on its employees and the question of whether this breaches Article 10 of the Qatar Oil Concession. Correspondents in this file include: Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Geoffrey Prior, Political Resident in the Persian Gulf at Bushire; Major Reginald George Evelin Alban, Political Agent at Bahrain; Ernest Vincent Packer, Petroleum Development (Qatar) Limited; and the India Office, London.
Description
This file concerns the construction of the first hospital at Doha, Qatar, in the mid-1940s. Correspondents in this file include: Lieutenant-Colonel Arnold Crawshaw Galloway, Political Resident in the Persian Gulf at Bahrain; Cornelius James Pelly, Political Agent at Bahrain; E P Donaldson, India Office, London; Dr W N Storm and Dr Paul Wilberforce Harrison of the American Mission at Bahrain.Details include funding by the American Mission and the possibility of funding from the Government of India based on the scale of that provided for medical facilities at Dubai; the necessity of medical facilities to service the oil industry and for a Political Officer to reside at Doha under Article 8 of the Anglo-Qatar treaty of 1916; relations between the American Mission and Qatar and the British administration; and the possibility of posting an European doctor to Qatar. Notable documents include a letter, dated 6 Dhu al-Qidah 1366 (20 September 1947), from ‘Abdullāh bin Jāsim Āl Thānī to the Political Agent at Bahrain regarding the construction of the hospital and a report by Storm and Harrison about their trip to the hospital at Doha in October 1947.
Description
The volume comprises telegrams, despatches, correspondence, memoranda, and notes relating to the Najd mission to Ibn Sa‘ūd by Harry St John Bridger Philby, Political Officer. Correspondence mainly concerns the dispatch and arrival of supplies for St John Philby: tea, tobacco, film, ammunition and arms, camping equipment, and medical supplies. After some correspondence (folio 64) St John Philby, signs his name and 'Pol Dept' thereafter. St John Philby also requests tents for Ibn Sa‘ūd. After St John Philby's mission is finished, arrangements are made to send his kit to his brother Ralph Montague Philby, Naval Transport Officer, Basra.Correspondence also discusses the dispatch of geological and natural history specimens to the Bombay Natural History Society. The volume includes correspondence in Arabic with Ahmad El Jaber Es Subah and Abdullah en-Nafisi who were helping with the supply operation.Correspondents include: Harry St John Bridger Philby, Political Department, the Political Agent at Kuwait; (Percy Gordon Loch; Daniel Vincent McCallum) Director of Sea Transport, Basrah; Deputy Civil Commissioner, Basrah Wilayet; Officer Commanding, H.T. Kalika.
Description
The volume comprises telegrams, despatches, correspondence, memoranda, and notes relating to the 1923 Kuwait Conference to arbitrate the Najd-Transjordan and Najd-Hijaz boundaries.The discussion in the volume relates to the following:a proposal to hold Conference at Kuwait to settle the Najd-Transjordania and Najd-Hijaz boundaries. Correspondence discusses costs and practical arrangements and arrival of delegations from Iraq, Transjordania and Nejd and uncertainty over arrival of delegates from Hidjaz;preliminary negotiations and letter of credentials from Abdullah bin al-Hussain, Ruler of Transjordania, for Ali Khulqi Bey; letter of credentials from Faisal, Ruler of Iraq for Sabih Bey Nasrat; letter of credentials from Ibn Saud for Saiyid Hamzah; discussion of the implications of the Mohammerah Iraq-Najd Convention;conference negotiations - correspondence discusses points put forward by the various delegations, including blood-money, raiding and losses, raids by the Ikhwan, and the collection of zakah;summaries of the sessions of the conference and arbitration;a draft agreement (ff 227-228) on raiding;a list of raids (ff 247-248);an index to topics discussed in the conference (folio 249).The principal correspondents in the volume include: the Secretary of State for Colonies, London; the Political Resident in the Persian Gulf, Stuart George Knox; the High Commissioner, Baghdad; the High Commissioner, Jerusalem; the Political Agent, Kuwait; Political Agent, Bahrain.