Description
This file contains handwritten (and in one case, typewritten) notes on a number of concessions relating to Persia and the Persian Gulf, in which the India Office's Political Department held an interest. The concessions are listed at the beginning of the file as follows:1. Euphrates and Tigris navigation (Lord Inchcape [James Mackay]);2. Mesopotamian oilfields (International);3. Mesopotamian irrigation (Sir John Jackson Ltd);4. Russian oilfields (The Anglo-Persian Oil Co.);5. Mohammerah [Khorramshahr]-Khorremabad Railway (Persian Railways Syndicate);6. Kerman Mining Concession (Persian Railways Syndicate);7. Baluchistan oilfields (Burma Oil Co. and Anglo-Persian Oil Co.);8. Mining concessions on the Persian Gulf Coast and Islands;9. Ispahan irrigation scheme;10. Koweit [Kuwait] oil;11. Imperial Bank of Persia's mint contract.Of these eleven concessions, notes on all except 2 and 8 are included. In each case, the notes detail the origins and current status of the concession.
Description
Distinctive Features:Space in the first line of title left blank.Includes ground plan and ‘PLAN OF TERRE PLEIN’ of Ras-Morbat Fort with corresponding longitudinal sections and elevations. Lettered for reference with a key in the bottom right-hand corner. Measurements reported.Inscriptions:On recto, bottom left-hand corner: ‘Isthmus Office July 15th 1846 Drawn by F. Welsh’.‘Copied in the Chief Engrs. Office Bombay 26th September 1846’.On recto, bottom center: ‘/Signed/ J. Kilner Captain Executive Engineer Aden’.On verso, bottom left-hand corner with bleed-through into the recto:‘In Bombay Secret Lre. No. 113 of 1846 Recd. via Southampton 10th Novr. 1846 Aden Fortifications’.
Description
This volume contains two works, Tarikh al-Khulafa’ (History of the caliphs) by al-Sūyūtī (1445−1505) and Athar al-Uwal fi Tartib al-Duwal (Primary indicators of well-regulated states) by al-Hasan ibn ‘Abd Allāh al-‘Abbāsī (died circa 1310). Al-Sūyūtī is renowned for his writings in the Islamic sciences, although not necessarily for this historical work. History of the Caliphs remains in print as a standard summation of the Sunni view of the rule of succession after the Prophet Muhammad’s death. The work reveals a gift for selection and synthesis rather than original interpretation, a characteristic of much of al-Sūyūtī’s writing. The author of the associated work, al-Hasan al-ʻAbbāsī, is said to have been related to the Abbasid caliph Hārūn al-Rashīd, but this may be apocryphal. The work should be considered a “mirror for princes” rather than an historical work. It provides advice on behavior for rulers, including admonitions on the treatment of subjects (e.g., tradesmen and farmers) and choice of counsellors, as well as such details as dress, menus, and etiquette at meals. Principles of behavior are rooted in the Qur’an and sayings of the Prophet, with frequent examples drawn from the lives of the prophets and rulers of old such as Moses and King David. History of the Caliphs is the main work in the volume. Primary Indicators is printed on its margins. Including a second work on the margin of a main text was common practice in the manuscript era, and often carried over into early printed books. Although it is no longer common, books are still produced with works on the margins to this day.
Description
Abu Ali al-Husayn Ibn Sina (980–1037) was one of the intellectual luminaries of the medieval world. Known in the Latin West as Avicenna, this Persian polymath was often referred to by Muslim authors as al-Shaykh al-Ra'īs, in acknowledgement of his role as one of the foremost savants of the Islamic world. A prolific author, Ibn Sina wrote on topics as varied as metaphysics, theology, medicine, psychology, earth sciences, physics, astronomy, astrology, and chemistry. His fame in Europe rests principally on his Canon of Medicine, which was translated into Latin and remained part of the standard curriculum for medical students for centuries. It was due to the reputation of this work, as well as of two of his other works that were translated into Latin, al-Adwīya al-qalbīya (Cardiac medication) and al-Urjūza fī al-ṭibb (a versified manual on medicine), that Ibn Sina  sometimes was referred to in the Latin West as princeps medicorum (prince of physicians). Presented here is a manuscript copy of the fifth book of Avicenna's Canon. The title al-Maqālah al-ʻilmīyah fī al-ḥājah ilā al-adwīyah al-murakkabah (The scientific essay on the need for compound remedies) is used as a heading for a section of the Canon by the author himself. The current book is organized into sections dealing with primary organs or medical conditions. Each section is subdivided into topics, such as symptoms, treatments, prescriptions for nutrition, and recipes for medicinal compounds. The section on the kidney, for example, includes subsections on the anatomy of the kidney, on various indicators of the status of the kidney, and a list of ailments, such as “hotness,” ”coldness,” or ”weakness” in the kidney, and remedies for them. The present manuscript appears to have been part of a larger book, the first 300 pages or so of which have been removed. The first page of text includes a blank field that presumably was meant for a frontispiece that was never completed. There are 35 lines per page. The text is in black ink, with headings in red ink (frequently repeated in the margins).